Author: Editor

Every UK employer has a responsibility to prevent illegal working by checking all of their workers have permission to work. This is done by conducting right to work checks before new recruits start their job, to ensure they aren’t disqualified from working in the UK, or from undertaking the work in question, because of their immigration status. If you fail to carry out right to work checks, or don’t carry them out in the correct way, and you’re found to be employing workers illegally, you may have to pay a civil penalty fine of up to £20,000 per worker. More…

Read More

By. law, employers must pay a minimum amount for the hours someone works. For workers aged 23 or over, this is called the National Living Wage (NLW). For workers aged under 23 and for apprentices, this is the National Minimum Wage (NMW). Minimum wage levels are reviewed annually by the Government. The rates are increasing from April 2022 as follows: Age Rates from 1 April 2022   Rates from 1 April 2021  23 years and over (National Living Wage) £9.50 £8.91 21 years to 22 years £9.18 £8.36 18 years to 20 years £6.83 £6.56 Under 18 years £4.81 £4.62 Apprentices…

Read More

Commonly-used HR phrases, words and terms explained. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Absence Time taken off work by an employee, categorised by authorised absence and unauthorised absence. Authorised absence refers to absence approved by someone with permission to do so and commonly includes annual leave, time off in lieu (TOIL), maternity, paternity and…

Read More

In some circumstances, suspending an employee may be unavoidable. Suspension could be due to health and safety or medical issues such as pregnancy, or more commonly, while a serious disciplinary matter is being investigated. In this guide for employers, line managers and HR personnel, we discuss the key considerations when suspending employees as part of a workplace investigation. The rules for suspending an employee will very much depend on the facts involved, although you should always bear in mind the following best practice advice when making any suspension decision. When can an employer suspend an employee? Suspension from work is…

Read More

Read on for our monthly digest for employers on upcoming employment law changes and key employment cases that have recently been decided. Unfair dismissal Mrs A Rodin v Dhillons Management Services Limited The claimant was employed by DMS1, an HR supplier now known as Dhillons Management Services. It was unclear when her employment with the company started, although she was noted as managing certain client accounts for 16 years, and in 2016 she was employed as an HR trainer. Mrs Rodin started her maternity leave on 19 June 2017 and expected to return to work on 19 March 2018. However,…

Read More

If you’ve been given a fit note by an employee and you’re not sure if it is genuine, would you know what to do? Employers should be prepared and trained to know how to deal with employees suspected of pulling sickies or exaggerating illness symptoms. It’s useful for managers and HR teams to be able to recognise when a fit note is genuine and to be able to spot a fake sick note. In this guide for employers, we discuss the rules on fit notes at work including how to spot a fake sick note and what to do if…

Read More

Knowing how to spot and prevent employee burnout could not only help to improve productivity for your business but also avoid the temporary or permanent loss of a valuable member of staff due to work-related stress. In this guide for employers, we look at what employee burnout actually means and how to spot the signs. We also consider the legal and practical risks of mismanaging workplace stress and the steps you should take as an employer to protect the wellbeing of your staff. What is employee burnout? Employee burnout refers to an acute state of physical or mental exhaustion resulting…

Read More

As an employer you will want to ensure the health and wellbeing of your employees during any period of sick leave. But there is a balance to be achieved between reasonable contact designed to check on an employee’s welfare, or to address any absence-related matters, and contact that may be considered excessive, unnecessary resulting in an adverse impact on the employee’s recovery. In this guide for employers, we look at the rules on contacting employees on sick leave, and on employees keeping in touch while absent due to illness, and what employers can do to meet their legal obligations while…

Read More

As an employer, the law says you can sack someone on sick leave but you must have good reason and follow a fair dismissal procedure, or you risk costly employment tribunal claims. In this guide for HR, managers and employers, we explain the rules on sickness absence dismissals and share best practice advice on how to avoid unfair dismissal claims. Is sickness absence a fair reason for dismissal? For a dismissal to be lawful, one of the requirements is that the employer’s reason for terminating employment has to be fair. By law, there are five potentially fair reasons for dismissal:…

Read More

Read on for our monthly digest for employers on upcoming employment law changes and key employment cases that have recently been decided. Furlough & unfair redundancy dismissal Mhindurwa v Lovingangels Care The employee was a live-in care assistant for a sole elderly client. During the first lockdown in 2020, the client moved to live in a care home. Since this had been her only client and since the pandemic had reduced the demand for live-in care work generally, this left no ongoing work for the employee to do for her employer and she was made redundant. She asked to be…

Read More